Youngest, youngest, youngest...

Lydia Ko has broken and set many, many records. Most are for being the youngest for this, youngest for that, youngest, youngest, youngest, youngest.
But when it comes to her temperament on the golf course, her ease with the world news media and her dealings with the public she shows maturity way beyond her years.
Following are just a few of her great records:-
>> On 26 August 2012, became the youngest winner of an LPGA Tour event (Canadian Women’s Open) at age 15 years, 4 months and 2 days.
>> On 10 February 2013, became the youngest winner of a Ladies European Tour event (NZ Women’s Open) at age 15 years, 9 months and 17 days.
>> On 25 August 2013, became the youngest and only amateur to win two LPGA Tour events – age 15 and 16 (2012 and 2013 Canadian Women’s Open).
>> On 20 July 2014, became the youngest millionaire on the LPGA in her first full season as a professional when she won the Marathon Classic taking her accumulated prize earnings to over a $US1 million at age 17 years, 2 months and 26 days.
>> On 12 November 2014, became the youngest winner of the LPGA Rookie of the Year in LPGA history at age 17 years, 6 months and 19 days surpassing Laura Baugh who won her title at 18 years, 6 months and 28 days.
>> On 23 November 2014, became the youngest player to win 5 events on a major tour at age 17 years, 6 months and 30 days.
>> On 23 November 2014, became the youngest and first player to win the biggest payout in LPGA history, taking home US$1.5 million after capturing the tour’s season-ending event and winning the inaugural Race to the CME Globe at age 17 years, 6 months and 30 days.
>> On 23 November 2014, became the youngest player to surpass $US2 million in career earnings 17 years, 6 months and 30 days – over $US3 million if include bonus prize of US$1 million for winning the Race to the CME Globe 2014 (CME Globe bonus prize does not count on player’s LPGA official earnings).
>> On 2 February 2015, became the youngest player of either gender to be ranked No 1 in professional golf at age 17 years, 9 months and 9 days.
>> On 13 September 2015, became the youngest woman to win a major championship at The Evian Championship in France, at age 18 years, 4 months and 20 days.
>>  On 13 September 2015, her closing round of 63 in the Evian was the record lowest final round in the history of women’s golf majors.
>> On 13 September 2015, became the youngest player to surpass $US4 million career earnings at age 18 years, 4 months and 20 days after winning her first major at the Evian Championship.
>> On 26 October 2015, became the youngest player to win 10 events on a major tour at age 18 years, 6 months and 2 days surpassing Horton Smith who set the PGA Tour mark of 21 years, 7 months in 1929, and Nancy Lopez who set the previous LPGA Tour record in 1979 at 22 years, 2 months, 5 days.
>> On 22 November 2015, became the youngest winner of the LPGA Official Money List at age 18 years, 6 months and 29 days.
>> On 22 November 2015, became the youngest winner of the LPGA Player of the Year in the 49 years history of the award at age 18 years, 6 months and 29 days, surpassing Nancy Lopez who won her title at age 21 and held the “youngest” title for 37 years.
>> On 21 February 2016, became the youngest player to surpass US$5 million career earnings at age 18 years, 9 months and 28 days.
>> On 3 April 2016, became the youngest women’s 2-time major winner at age 18 years, 11 months and 10 days, surpassing Se Ri Pak who won her second major at age 20 years, 9 months, and 8 days.
>> On 3 April 2016, became the youngest two-time major winner (man or woman) in 147 years at age 18 years, 11 months and 10 days. Scotsman Young Tom Morris won the 1868 and 1869 British Opens; he was 17 years, 5 months and 8 days when he claimed his first and aged 18 years, 4 months and 27 days when he claimed his second. It should be noted that there were only 10 players (two withdrew) in the 1868 British Open and nine players (five withdrew) in the 1869 British Open; all players were from Scotland; most players were greenkeepers and caddies; it was not until 1871 that it included more than one golf club; both were a one-day event, played over 12 holes three times for a total of 36 holes.